Saturday, May 28, 2016

Salicorne, Perce-pierre, Criste-marine or Haricot de Mer - The Vegetable Salicornia or Samphire in French Cuisine..

from

Behind the French menu

by

Bryan G. Newman

   

Fresh Salicornia

Photograph courtesy of niicow79

  
Salicornia is not a seaweed.

 

Salicornia or Samphire is often, mistakenly, called an edible seaweed; it is not.  Salicornia, of which there are many family members, grows in salt marshes and along the coast.  Its shape, not its taste, also gives it another name, sea asparagus.

Salicornia on French menus:

Terrine de Poisson à la Salicorne A fish pate with Saliconia.

   

Mesclun - Queues d'Écrevisses - Salicornes  - A mixed green salad, freshwater crayfish tails and Salicornia.  A salade mescun should, by tradition, include at least five different salad greens.

    

Filet de Sandre aux Salicornes, Beurre Blanc – A filet of Zander, Pike-Perch with saliconia served with a Beurre Blanc sauce. 

  

Fresh tuna with Salicornia.

Photograph courtesy of Gourmandise

 

Flétan Meunière aux Salicornes Halibut prepared in a meunier sauce, that is lemon juice and parsley added to melted butter. 

 

 Conchiglie Farcies aux Gambas et Salicornes. Shell shaped pasta stuffed with large shrimp and Salicornia.



Salicornia on marshland.

Photograph courtesy of maxime raynal

  

Young salicornia plants are gathered from April through July. They will be used in salads, sauces, soups; they may also be pickled and then used as a condiment. Their shape also gives them another name, the asparagus of the sea. However, that name refers to their look, not their taste.

   

Collecting salicornia

Photograph courtesy of traaf

 

Connected Posts:

   

Écrivisse - Crayfish, Crawdad, or Crawfish. The Écrivisse is the Freshwater Crayfish and may be Among the Crustaceans on Your French Menu. Crustaceans III.

 

France's Butter Sauces I. The Three Most Popular Butter Sauces on French Menus.

 

Pates and Terrines. An introduction to the meat, fish, vegetable and fruit pates on French menus.

 

Sandre, Zander in the USA and Pike Perch in the UK. Sandre in French Cuisine.

  

 

 

Bryan G. Newman

 

Behind the French Menu

Copyright 2016

 

For information on the unpublished book behind this blog contact Bryan Newman

at

behindthefrenchmenu@gmail.com