Saturday, January 21, 2017

Lieu Jaune – Pollack, the Fish. Pollack is also called Callagh and Coley in the UK. Pollack on French Menus.

from
Behind the French Menu
by
Bryan G. Newman

Reeling Pollack in.

Lieu Jaune or Colin  –  Pollack, the fish.  In the UK also called Callagh, Coley, Coalfish, Margate Hake, Dover Hake and Lythe, and in the USA the European Pollock. 

Pollack is a member of the cod family with similar white, flaky meat so that it will often be cooked and served with cod recipes. When offered as poached or baked filets pollack is usually served with a sauce as it on its own it can be somewhat dry.   Pollack grow quite large with many fish weighing in over 8 kilos (18 lbs), so you will be served a fillet. 
  
Filet of baked pollack.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/55935853@N00/4485844101/
 
When a fish on a French menu is named Colin then failing some clarification I choose something else.  Colin in France can be the name of any at least three or more fish including Lieu Jaune, pollack, Lieu Noir, saithe, and Merlu, hake.  The other fish have similar tastes and texture; nevertheless, I choose something else because I like to know what I am actually eating.  Using the name Colin just tells me the restaurant is not really sure what they bought. However, confusion exists outside France as well; pollack has many names in the UK and is often mistaken for a family member called walleye pullack in the UK and Alaskan pollock in the USA. 
   
Pollack on French Menus:
 
Filet de Lieu Jaune à l'Huile d'Olive, Risotto de Pommes de Terre au Wakame – Filet of pollack cooked with olive oil and served with a potato risotto flavored with wakame seaweed.

Lieu Jaune Fumé aux Aiguilles de Pin –  Pollack smoked over pine needles.

Le Duo de Lotte et Lieu Jaune Sauce Champagne – A matched serving of monkfish and pollack in a Champagne sauce.
   
A filet of poached pollack.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stuart_spivack/15065518687/
  
Escalope de Lieu Jaune Pochée au Beurre d'Agrumes – A filet of pollack poached in grapefruit flavored butter.

Dos de Lieu Jaune Avec des Gnocchis de Potimarron aux Algues Nori, Jus de Moules -  A thick cut from the back of a large pollack, (considered the tastiest portion), served with gnocchi made with pumpkin and nori seaweed and flavored with the cooking juices from mussels.
  
A poached pollack steak.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rjw1/2314648984/
    
Pollack in the languages of France’s neighbors:
    
(Catalan - abadejo), (Dutch - pollak), (German – pollack), (Italian –merluzzo giallo) (Spanish –badexo).
    
Connected Posts:
 
 
 


 
 
Bryan G. Newman
 
Behind the French Menu
Copyright 2010, 2017.

For information on the unpublished book behind this blog contact Bryan Newman
at


Pelardon des Cévennes AOP - The Cheese Called Pelardon des Cévennes. Pelardon in French Cuisine.

from
Behind the French Menu
by
Bryan G. Newman
   
Pelardon des Cévennes AOP
  
Pelardon or Pelardon des Cévennes AOP
  
Pelardon des Cévennes is a 50% fat, goat’s milk cheese made with unpasteurized milk. When this cheese is first sold after 10 or 12 days of aging it is a very mild creamy cheese; then it will often be served warm with a salad; older cheeses are dryer and have a bite that the cognoscenti prefer.  These are tiny cheeses; a Pelardon cheese rarely weighs over 60 grams (2 ounces).  The cheese has an AOP that guarantees that whoever makes the cheese it is made in exactly the same way. Despite that there are differences in the taste among the different producers; the taste is affected by the grasses, plants, and chestnuts that the goats eat on particular farms.
   
Members of the production team.
  
The producers claim that their cheese has a two-thousand-year-old history that began when it was much demand in Rome and assuredly a cheese from the same area is documented by Pliny.  If today’s Pelardon is the same cheese that was ordered by Romans I do not know, but in18th century today’s cheese could be identified with the name Peraldou and that eventually became Pelardon. 
   
The Pelardon cheese.
   
The department of Lozère where Pelardon is produced is both beautiful and the place to go for visitors who want France without hordes of tourists.  Lozère also has less than 80,000 inhabitants; that's less than 15 people per square kilometer (6 people per square mile).   
 
The Cévennes is also home to other highly rated food products including the Oignon Doux des Cévennes AOP,  the sweet onion of the Cevennes, the Reinette du Vigan apples and the Belles de Bancels potatoes.
    
Pelardon des Cévennes on French menus: 
   
Médaillon de Veau, Sauce au Pélardon des Cévennes An oval or round esaclop, a medallion, of veal served with a Pélardon des Cévennes cheese sauce.
 
Pélardon des Cévennes Grillé sur Lit de Roquette et Sorbet Yaourt au Lait de Brebis  - The Pélardon des Cévennes cheese grilled and served on a bed of rocket salad greens with a sorbet made of sheep’s milk yogurt.
  
A Pélardon des Cévennes tart fine.
The tart is made with a base of puff pastry with tomatoes, the Pélardon des Cévennes cheese, and the AOP sweet onions of the Cevennes.
 
Ravioles au Pélardon des Cévennes sur un Crémeux de Champignons au Bouillon de Poule Ravioli filled with Pélardon des Cévennes cheese accompanied by a creamy mushroom sauce prepared in a light chicken broth.
   
Salade du Jardin et son Aumônière de Pélardon Rôti au Miel des Cévennes  - A garden salad served with a pouch of Pélardon des Cévennes cheese roasted with honey from the Cevennes.
   
Salade Verte, Pélardon des Cévennes Chaud sur Pain de Campagne  - A green salad served with hot  Pélardon des Cévennes cheese on country bread.
   
Follow the sign to the village of
Sainte Croix Vallée Française
On the first Sunday in May, every year, the Fête du Pélardon welcomes visitors in the village of Sainte Croix Vallée Française.
   
Tarte Fine aux Oignons Doux des Cévennes et Pélardon Gratiné  - A tart made with a flat disk of puff pastry, and the sweet Cevennes AOP onions browned under the grill with the Pélardon des Cévennes cheese.
  
The cheese is made in and around the two tiny villages of Barre de Cévennes and Pompidou in the southeast of the department of Lozère in the region of Occitanie.  The fete celebrating the cheese is held in the nearby village of Sainte Croix Vallée Française.  (Occitanie is the new super region that was created on 1-1-2016 by combining the regions of Languedoc-Roussillon and the Midi-Pyrénées).
    
For the link to buying cheese in France and taking cheese home click here.

Connected Posts:
 
 


 
 
 
 
 
  
 
Bryan G. Newman
 
Behind the French Menu
Copyright 2010, 2017
     
For information on the unpublished book behind this blog contact Bryan Newman
at
behindthefrenchmenu@gmail.com


Radis du Daikon – The Daikon, Japanese or Chinese radish. Daikon on French Menus.

from
Behind the French Menu
by
Bryan G. Newman
   
The daikon radish.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/globalismpictures/5846021312/
  

  Daikon or Radis du Daikon 
    
The Daikon, Japanese or Chinese radish, sometimes called the white radish or giant radish. Daikon is a mild radish unless it is pickled to make it spicy; it served both fresh and cooked.   French chefs use the daikon like other radishes as well as creating recipes that emphasize the daikon’s different texture. The cresson daikon, daikon cress, the tasty young daikon shoots are also added to salads.
 
These radishes originated in China, and there are a number of varieties with the most popular looking somewhat like a large white carrot.
  
A cross section of a daikon radish.
   
The daikon radish on French menus:

Rougets Barbet Croustillants, Daikon et Agrumes à la Coriandre – Crisply fried red mullet, the fish, served with daikon radish and citrus fruits flavored with coriander.
   
Pickled daikon and carrots.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jesswebb/3008589983/
  
Carpaccio de Filet Angus au Poivre avec sa Choucroute de Daikon et Aïoli Carpaccio made from slices of a fillet, the US tenderloin, of peppered Angus beef served with a choucroute made with pickled daikon flavored with aioli. (The original choucroute is an Alsatian version of the German saukraut and is made with pickled cabbage; here thinly sliced daikon will have been pickled to create the daikon choucroute).
  
Truite Saumonée Confite Basse Température, Mousseline de Daïkon au Chèvre Frais, Sel de Kombu - Salmon trout cooked slowly at a low temperature and served with a  very light moose made with daikon and fresh goat’s cheese and a sea salt infused with kombu seaweed.
  
A large size daikon.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/tinfoilraccoon/5723187322/

Le Poulpe, Pickles d'Oignons, Radis Daikon et Jus et Boudin Basque - Octopus served with pickled onions and daikon with a natural gravy along with spicy Basque pork sausages.

Poulet Grillé, Concombre, Laitue, Carottes Et Daikons Marinés, Fines Herbes – Grilled chicken accompanied by carrots, lettuce, carrots and marinated daikon flavored with France’s most favored herb group Les Fine Herbes.
   
A daikon choucroute.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/imgeorge/9363540538/
 
Noix De Saint Jacques, Betterave, Daikon - The meat of the king scallop served with beetroot and daikon.
 
Agneau Fermier, Salsifis, Daïkon Aigre Doux,  Ail Noir – Farm raised lamb served with salsify, (the oyster plant),  sweet and sour pickled daikon and black garlic.
    
Daikon in the languages of France’s neighbors:
  
(Catalan -  daikon, rave del Japó), (Dutch - daikon ), (German - daikon-rettich, Japanischer riesenrettich), (Italian -  daikon radice), (Spanish - rábano Japonés, rábano Chino).

Connected Posts:
   
   
 


    
 
 
  
 
 
 

Bryan G. Newman

Behind the French Menu
Copyright 2010, 2017
   
For information on the unpublished book behind this blog contact Bryan Newman
at

behindthefrenchmenu@gmail.com